The 341st Training Squadron, located in San Antonio, Texas, provides trained military working dogs and handlers for the Department of Defense, as well as other government agencies and allies. The squadron aims to be a world leader in procurement, training, veterinary care and distribution of military working dogs and their handlers. As part of that goal, the squadron commissioned the construction of new housing structures to provide world-class facilities for the animals.

Stiver Engineering provided structural engineering services for the design of the foundations, structural steel and precast kennels for the nine war dog housing buildings.

The fire station project at Randolph Air Force Base in San Antonio involved a staging area to house an equipment storage facility, an enclosed administrative building person, a tire storage area, exterior lighting, a fire hydrant, a new motorized truck/trailer entrance, providing motorized capability to the existing truck/trailer entrance, and a new pedestrian entrance. The new motorized truck/trailer entrance required designing a proper support to cross a natural open storm water channel.

Stiver Engineering provided the contractor with construction consulting and structural engineering services for the design of the building foundation for the project.

Division 1 of this Project consists of, but is not limited to, the following: raw water pump station including passive intake screen, intake line, wetwell, two (2) vertical turbine pumps and space for a third pump, bridge crane, and potassium permanganate feed system; cast-in-place concrete 2.5 MGD pretreatment facilities including two-stage rapid mix, two-stage flocculation, high rate sedimentation using plate settlers, and hoseless sludge collectors; 2.5 MGD (expandable to 5.0 MGD membrane filtration facility including membrane filtration treatment modules, CIP system, neutralization system, onsite hypochlorite generation system, chemical feed systems, control room, lab, restrooms, locker room, offices, break room, finished water pumping facilities (two (2) vertical turbine pumps and space for a third pump); finished water storage consisting of a 75-foot-diameter by 30-foot tall 1.0-MG pre-stressed concrete storage tank; plant control system (PCS) consisting of field mounted instruments and control devices, non-proprietary distributed control system utilizing personal computers (PCs) and programmable logic controllers (PLCs); all related site work, piping, electrical, and any other activities incidental to the completion of this Project. Division 2 of this Project consists of, but is not limited to, approximately 8,975 linear feet of 20-inch ductile iron raw water transmission main from the new Lake Hartwell Raw Water Intake on Durham Road to the existing 20-inch main on South Carolina State Highway 59 near the intersection with Fair Play Boulevard in Fair Play, South Carolina, including all related equipment and appurtenances, connections to existing waterlines and facilities, erosion control, grassing, and any other activities incidental to the completion of this Project. No additional specifications were given.

Stiver Engineering was retained by the contractor to provide structural engineering services for the design of the caisson (raw water pump station).  The caisson is 16 ft. diameter by 50 ft. deep.  The contractor successfully sunk the caisson in wet sand.  Stiver Engineering designed the reinforced concrete caisson to be sunk and sealed underwater.  This is a technique that we spent many years learning from working with contractors while sinking caissons in the saturated sandy soils of South Texas.

The DigIndy Project is a nearly 28-mile long network of 18 foot diameter deep rock tunnels being built 250-feet beneath the city.  Beginning near the Indiana State Fairgrounds on the north, and ending on the south side of Indianapolis, DigIndy will be the largest public works project in the city’s history.

The tunnel system will extend along Fall Creek, White River, Pogues Run, Pleasant Run and Bean Creek to create a collective, underground storage and transport facility for wastewater.  All sewage stored and transported in the tunnel system is sewage that otherwise could have gone directly into local waterways. The tunnel system is a component of the federally-mandated plan to reduce raw sewage overflows into the waterways.

The Indianapolis Deep Rock Tunnel Connector Pump Station Project included a screening and grit removal system consisting of 180 feet of 6 foot diameter connector tunnel, a subterranean pump room that is 60 feet wide by 98 feet long by 66 feet tall, a 44 foot diameter main access shaft with an enclosed elevator, enclosed stairway and various utility systems.  The subterranean pump room is located 250 feet below ground surface.  The project also includes a 23 foot diameter equipment shaft with embedded electrical conduits, an at grade pump station building, an at grade main access shaft building, an at grade discharge chamber and miscellaneous site work.

Stiver Engineering was retained for construction consulting by the contractor to design thrust blocks and pipe supports for the intake piping, miscellaneous piping running up the 250 foot access shaft walls and piping for the discharge chamber.  Stiver Engineering designed the permanent dewatering system for the large subterranean pump room 250 feet below the surface.  We also assisted in the design of a mobile concrete forming system for the construction of the 6 foot diameter connector tunnel.

The City of San Antonio, Texas is completing one of its largest flood control construction projects to date, a multimillion dollar effort to improve storm water drainage into Woodlawn Lake by replacing the existing channel with a new channel of greater capacity in order to remove numerous private properties and public infrastructure from the 100 year flood plain, which experienced catastrophic flooding in 2002.

The construction of Phase 2 of the Seeling Channel Improvements project includes completing the channel work from near Wilson Boulevard to Morning Glory Drive and features the demolition and replacement of 2,470 lineal feet of existing concrete channel and 2 concrete vehicular bridges which cross the channel at Huisache Avenue and Morning Glory Drive.  The excavation for the new cast in place concrete channel structure averages 60 feet wide by 15 feet deep and is supported by an engineered steel beam and wood lagging shoring system in order to accommodate the limited work area access between the channel and adjacent private properties.

In advance of the new concrete channel and bridge improvements, existing underground potable water and sewer lines were kept in service while the installation of new replacement underground utilities took place.  New underground utilities include 3,500 lineal feet of 8 inch to 16 inch water line, 2,500 lineal feet of 30 inch sewer line and 350 lineal feet of 24 inch to 60 inch storm drain line.

Stiver Engineering provided the contractor with construction consulting through the design of the steel beam and wood lagging shoring system that the channel walls were poured against.